Nat Sciver’s second century against Australia in the tournament is in vain as England dismiss for 285 chasing a whopping 357 in the World Cup final; Australia win the World Cup for a record seventh time with a ninth successive victory in this year’s tournament as Alyssa Healy scores 170

Last update: 03/04/22 11:00

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Australia won by 71 points against England in the final of the Women’s World Cup

Australia won by 71 points against England in the final of the Women’s World Cup

Nat Sciver’s unreleased 148s were in vain as Alyssa Healy’s stunning 170s from 138 balls propelled Australia to World Cup glory with a 71-point win over defending champions England. which earned them a seventh title.

Healy punished England for dropping them at 42 as they battled their way to the highest score in a men’s or women’s World Cup final.

His 26 limits propelled Australia to a formidable 356-5 – the champions have hit 120 of their last 10 overs – after being batted by Heather Knight at Hagley Oval in Christchurch.

Sciver topped the score with a sparkling 121-ball response, hitting his second ton against Australia in this tournament after going 109 against them in the group stage, as England kept up the pace while wickets dropped at the other end.

A ninth-wicket stand from 65 with Charlie Dean (21) from 213-8 kept England’s hopes of a remarkable win alive, but they were ultimately dismissed for 285 in 43.4 overs – spinners Alana King ( 3-64) and Jess Jonassen (3-57) sharing six wickets.

Knight’s side missed out on becoming the first England side to successfully defend the 50-plus World Cup title, with Australia ending a pristine campaign with a ninth win from nine to become world champions in both forms of white ball after winning the last two T20s. World Cups, in 2018 and 2020.

Nat Sciver got her centenary with just 90 balls as she kept England's slim hopes of winning the Women's World Cup final alive

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Nat Sciver got her centenary with just 90 balls as she kept England’s slim hopes of winning the Women’s World Cup final alive

Nat Sciver got her centenary with just 90 balls as she kept England’s slim hopes of winning the Women’s World Cup final alive

Australia favorites dismantle England attack

England’s hopes of retaining their title crumbled after losing their opening three games in the competition, including a 12-point loss to Australia in their opener.

But, on the brink of elimination, Knight’s side launched a stunning revival with five straight wins taking them into Sunday’s showpiece against a behemoth of an Australian side.

Australia were heavy favorites heading into the game, with their recent form unstoppable including winning all seven of their previous ODIs against England and winning 12-4 in the Women’s Ashes multi-format series earlier this winter.

The Southern Stars lived up to their bill as Healy’s second century in as many games – she scored 129 in the semi-final against West Indies – led Australia to the highest score in a final of the Women’s World Cup, beating the 259-7 they had carded in their victory over the West Indies in 2013.

Alyssa Healy reached her century with 138 balls as she continued to punish England bowling in the final

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Alyssa Healy reached her century with 138 balls as she continued to punish England bowling in the final

Alyssa Healy reached her century with 138 balls as she continued to punish England bowling in the final

Healy, who was also dropped on 136, shared more than 150 partnerships with opening partner Rachael Haynes (68 of 93) and No. 3 Beth Mooney (62 of 47) as England bowlers, bar Anya Shrubsole (3-46), were created. toiling on a belt-batting lane, raising questions about whether Knight had made a mistake choosing to bowl.

Things could have been different had Healy and Haynes not been dropped in the 40s in the 21st round of innings, which started with Australia 92-0 – Kate Cross the unlucky bowler as Danni Wyatt knocked Haynes down at the stitch back before Sciver knocked Healy down to midwicket.

Healy made the most of his reprieve, playing a series of scintillating offside shots and some inventive scoops, also in a thrilling stroke as her husband – Australian men’s fast bowler Mitchell Starc – watched happily from the sidelines. crowd.

England had to wait for the wickets as Australia dominate

England had to wait until 30 for their first breakthrough – Haynes skyping Sophie Ecclestone (1-71) to Tammy Beaumont at fullback – then until 46 for their second, when Healy was puzzled by the wicketkeeper Amy Jones off Shrubsole.

Healy deservedly received a standing ovation as she walked away after playing a dominant hand in another World Cup final, after smoking a 75 from 39 as Australia beat India to win the T20 World Cup at home a few years ago.

The opener’s outing sparked a group of wickets to death, with Ash Gardner (1) exhausted and Shrubsole on a hat-trick when she fired Lanning (10) and Mooney from successive deliveries in the 48th.

Ellyse Perry, fit after a back spasm to play only as a batter, hit an unbeaten 17 on 10 balls to take Australia past 350 as Shrubsole’s final lasted 15.

England flyhalf Wyatt (4) couldn’t sustain her semi-final of the century against South Africa as she was castled through the gate by Megan Schutt (2-42), who then pinned Beaumont (27) lbw.

Sciver, who reversed an lbw dismissal against King early in his innings, shared stands in the forties with Knight (26) and Jones (20), then added a half-century partnership with Sophia Dunkley ( 23).

At 179-4 in the 28th, England had hope – only for that to be seemingly snuffed out when they slipped to 213-8 when Dunkley, Katherine Brunt (1), Ecclestone (3) and Cross (2 ) are gone.

Sciver’s alliance with Dean kept England afloat but Dean and Shrubsole (1) were then dismissed in successive overs as Australia picked up a 38th win in their last 39 ODIs and underlined their most dominant sports team status.